A Man, A Plan, A Vacuum Cleaner, Havana: a review of the absurdly wonderful Our Man in Havana

by Monika Viktorova Looking to escape the drab, grey cold outside? Step into the colourful and absurd world of Our Man in Havana, the Varscona Theater Ensemble and Bright Young Things’ production of the novel by Graham Greene, adapted by Clive Francis. Peppered with bawdy humor and more winks to the audience than I can count, the story follows bumbling, ineffective Wormold, a vacuum salesman … Continue reading A Man, A Plan, A Vacuum Cleaner, Havana: a review of the absurdly wonderful Our Man in Havana

The Power of Cute

by Rita Maria Neyer Here is a thought that many of you can probably relate to in one way or another (for women of colour, LBGTQ+, and non-binary people, the story would be even more complex, but I am bound to speak from my own experience as a cis-gender ‘white’ woman). Maybe a friend told you about a similar situation, or maybe you’ve been there … Continue reading The Power of Cute

Before It Was A Needle

by Katherine Abbass Once Molly had explained to me her ancestry, things started making more sense. I knew there were freshwater leeches and saltwater leeches and that they, unlike snakes, really were slimy to the touch. Her parents wanted her to be a doctor, of course; medical history tells us that leeches were used to extract blood from patients. The sensation isn’t even too bad. … Continue reading Before It Was A Needle

What’s in the News?

by Christopher Berger Like it or not, we’re faced with the need to curate our sources of information. In one sense, we are blessed with innumerable, easily accessed media for news. But as anyone who has spent any time online will know, an overwhelming majority of it is, frankly, garbage. We are therefore compelled to be selective. Twitter and Facebook are good cases in point … Continue reading What’s in the News?

(Not) Unpacking My Library

by Kevin Holowack In the past couple years, I’ve packed and unpacked all my belongings four times. It’s not an egregious amount of moving, true, but it’s enough to make you reconsider what inanimate things you’ve chosen to share in your private life and how they affect you. As an urban-dweller, I’m part of a large category of people who idealize a simple existence, a … Continue reading (Not) Unpacking My Library

The Guns of August (A Book Review)

by Nathan Pinkoski Centennials of the battles of the Great War continue to fill the calendars of states with sombre commemorations. Despite these commemorations, however, fatalistic assertions about the origins and causes of the Great War dominate, even in learned circles. In these learned circles, 1914-1918 is a logical deduction from the study of 1871, 1789, or even 1648. It is subject to self-evident laws … Continue reading The Guns of August (A Book Review)

Experience Turbulent Landings – Edmonton’s Very Own National Art Showcase

by Erica Osko Turbulent Landings showcases some of the latest Canadian and international art, born right from some of the world’s most pressing issues. Catherine Crowston, Executive Director and Chief Curator of the Art Gallery of Alberta, says that curating contemporary art is all about being part of current conversations. “You’re always trying to keep on top of the newest news. We really think about … Continue reading Experience Turbulent Landings – Edmonton’s Very Own National Art Showcase

Alberta Ballet Presents Dangerous Liaisons – Human ego in a dance of shadows

by Zosia Czarnecka Ballet is an incredible art form because of its ability to push boundaries and showcase hidden sides of human consciousness and values. In Dangerous Liaisons, Alberta Ballet’s second performance of the season, Jean Grand-Maitre beautifully conveys how “ego can drive people to become truly evil.” The entire production plays with contrasts and ignores classical rules of ballet to showcase the egotistical, greedy, … Continue reading Alberta Ballet Presents Dangerous Liaisons – Human ego in a dance of shadows

Creativity within Restrictions – A review of Les Feluettes (Edmonton Opera)

by Gabrielle Johnson The idea of a modern opera is a cause for some trepidation. Unlike reproductions of classical operas, more modern works have yet to stand the test of time, and a scrutinizing audience whose members span generations. However, Les Feluettes holds up fairly well. The opera, performed by many of the original Montréalais cast, is sung in French with English surtitles. Certain quirks … Continue reading Creativity within Restrictions – A review of Les Feluettes (Edmonton Opera)