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The Outliner: A Beginner’s Guide to Abstraction (Review)

by Monika Viktorova Mascall Dance’s The Outliner, a performance comprising eight movements, transports us on an immersive, ethereal and, at times, incongruous journey. The dancers, sets, music and costume-prop hybrids combine to tell stories of metamorphosis, of change, of temporality, and of legacy. The first disclaimer for this review is that dance is evocative in a way that is incompletely captured by language. The second … Continue reading The Outliner: A Beginner’s Guide to Abstraction (Review)

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Struggling for Recognition

by Neil Van Horne Finding meaningful work in Canada is especially challenging for refugees As of 2013, more than four in five Canadians believed multiculturalism was a collectively shared value, according to Statistics Canada. It is seen as part of the fabric of our Canadian identity. But it is all too familiar to meet an immigrant who is working well below what their capabilities are … Continue reading Struggling for Recognition

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Rossini’s Cinderella: Appearance is everything… Or is it? (Review)

by Jacqueline Withers What comes to mind when you think of the opera? If you are like me, you are probably picturing a Viking-helmeted, rotund woman singing in a foreign language at a pitch that could shatter glass. You may also have imagined an audience full of elitist individuals, decked out in fancy clothes and clutching their opera glasses as they sneer at their social … Continue reading Rossini’s Cinderella: Appearance is everything… Or is it? (Review)

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Is Math Detrimental to Self-Esteem? Or Has Social Activism Gone Too Far?

by Keaton Peterson As any child fluent in rudimentary arithmetic will tell you, some numbers are bigger than others. Three pennies is less than four pennies, five pennies is more than four pennies – case closed, right? The answer is not so simple for a primary school teacher and “Feelings Over Fractions” activist Stephanie Buchanan who is stirring up controversy in an Edmonton elementary school. Buchanan … Continue reading Is Math Detrimental to Self-Esteem? Or Has Social Activism Gone Too Far?

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“Survival Guide” for the Contemporary Age: A Review

by Srosh Hassan How does the idea of survival change over time? As the problems we face evolve, whether borne by geographic, social, personal, economic or political stresses, so do the ways we seek to survive in those environments. The Art Gallery of Alberta’s newest exhibit, Survival Guide, focuses on how contemporary artists are addressing survival strategies and features the different ways people adapt to challenges to … Continue reading “Survival Guide” for the Contemporary Age: A Review

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Symphonie 5.1: An immersive journey of light and movement (Review)

by Sylwia Romanowska & Benjamin Kostiuk Performed on January 20th and 21st at the Timm’s Centre for the Arts, Isabelle van Grimde’s Symphonie 5.1 enthralled audiences with a stunning marriage of lighting, live music, and dance. The set, with its minimalistic aesthetic and stunning visuals, made for an opening full of intrigue and opportunity. The hour-long performance was a journey of light, modern music, and … Continue reading Symphonie 5.1: An immersive journey of light and movement (Review)

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Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo Review (Alberta Ballet)

I love the ballet. There’s some indelible beauty in watching the perfection of human grace, form, and movement. The ballet reaches for impossible heights and makes them seem almost attainable, remaining just tantalizingly out of reach. When a ballet manages to accomplish all of these things, one feels transported into another realm entirely, enraptured by the feeling of magic and limitless wonder. When it fails … Continue reading Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo Review (Alberta Ballet)

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Alberta Ballet Seduces with Dracula

by Zosia Czarnecka Alberta Ballet has swooped in to revive the lingering Halloween aura with a masterful production of Dracula this weekend. The company debuts their sixth decade with a breathtaking set commissioned in Chile, an astounding hand-embroidered 20-lb vampire cape, and special effects including a full-sized carriage tumbling onto stage and pyrotechnics erupting in the finale. There are many cultural showcases in Edmonton that … Continue reading Alberta Ballet Seduces with Dracula

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Edmonton Opera’s Turandot Triumphs as a Western Paean to Mythic China

by Sarah Haeubl Edmonton Opera’s 2016-2017 season kicks off this week with the formidable Turandot, Giacomo Puccini’s final masterpiece. Completed after Puccini’s death by Franco Alfano and premiered before Italian audiences in 1926, Turandot exists in the modern world as something of a paradox, with timeless musical appeal and universal themes, but an aesthetic that is clearly a product of its time, and the Orientalist … Continue reading Edmonton Opera’s Turandot Triumphs as a Western Paean to Mythic China

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Alberta: We’re Big in Japan! | By Antony Ta

Imagine this scene: terror grips you as take the wrong right turn and you’re greeted by the world’s largest dinosaur. Yes, it is the world’s LARGEST dinosaur. Terrible T-Rex stares down with murderous intent as you pull into the angle parking. You’re safe for now; you remember that dinosaurs have been extinct for over 65 million years. It now becomes clear that you turned too … Continue reading Alberta: We’re Big in Japan! | By Antony Ta