Lindsey Catherine Photo + Media 2017

Pomp and Circumstance: An Interview With Photographer Aaron Pedersen

by Monika Viktorova On Saturday, March 25th, the Alberta Art Gallery (AGA) will host the latest of its “Refinery” evening parties. A ‘narcissistic’ take on their usual event, “Self-Refinery” will blend ‘themes from current exhibitions of portraiture with social media and pop culture.” Among the artists exhibiting at  “Self-Refinery” is home-grown talent Aaron Pedersen. Born in Lethbridge and raised in the suburbs of St. Albert, Pedersen’s … Continue reading Pomp and Circumstance: An Interview With Photographer Aaron Pedersen

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Edmonton Opera’s ‘Elektra’: Mostly Electrifying

by Nicholas Siennicki If there’s nothing else to be taken away from this review, it’s that if you, dear reader, even have a passing fancy in the arts, go see Elektra. The performance may not be the absolute pinnacle of the form, but it is relentlessly entertaining, investing, short, and intelligible. In other words, a performance that is both pleasing to the connoisseur, and the … Continue reading Edmonton Opera’s ‘Elektra’: Mostly Electrifying

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The Changing Image of the “Self” in the Digital Era (Interview with Marilène Oliver & Daniel Laforest)

by Zosia Czarnecka On February 25th, TEDxUAlberta hosted its second annual conference. We had the opportunity to interview two of the conference’s speakers, Marilène Oliver and Daniel Laforest, about the crossroads of their work. In particular, we were interested in delineating how they each defined the difference between the “self” and the physical body, their thoughts on the implications of the digital era on our … Continue reading The Changing Image of the “Self” in the Digital Era (Interview with Marilène Oliver & Daniel Laforest)

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The Outliner: A Beginner’s Guide to Abstraction (Review)

by Monika Viktorova Mascall Dance’s The Outliner, a performance comprising eight movements, transports us on an immersive, ethereal and, at times, incongruous journey. The dancers, sets, music and costume-prop hybrids combine to tell stories of metamorphosis, of change, of temporality, and of legacy. The first disclaimer for this review is that dance is evocative in a way that is incompletely captured by language. The second … Continue reading The Outliner: A Beginner’s Guide to Abstraction (Review)

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Rethinking our Perceptions and Embracing Change

by Maja Staka Saturday afternoon, Kathryn Lennon, a planner with the City of Edmonton’s CITYlab team, walked onstage to face a crowd of faces shrouded in darkness. Her smile was warm, and her voice unwavering. Pointing towards the PowerPoint behind her, she seemed eager to continue. “So whenever I visit a new city, I end up in Chinatown because I find that there’s a sense … Continue reading Rethinking our Perceptions and Embracing Change

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Political Redux: February 14, 2017

by Chris Berger As of this Valentine’s Day, electorates continue their affairs with populism and ethno-nationalism.  Europe in particular has always had its flirtations with fringe elements in mainstream politics, whereas in North America, institutions like First-Past-The-Post have tended, as a general rule, to keep eccentrics both malicious and benign either out of the political spotlight altogether, or reined in by more moderate forces in … Continue reading Political Redux: February 14, 2017

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Funding Basic Science: A Leap of Faith

by Sydney Hampshire “Ipsa scientia potestas est.” Knowledge itself is power. Science loves Latin for naming. Organisms, anatomy, and phenomena across the disciplines use Latin and Latin, it seems, has an innate tendency towards poetry. “Knowledge itself is power” directs us towards the need for basic science – because basic scientific principles inform our understanding of everything else around us. Unfortunately, in recent years, scientific … Continue reading Funding Basic Science: A Leap of Faith

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Rossini’s Cinderella: Appearance is everything… Or is it? (Review)

by Jacqueline Withers What comes to mind when you think of the opera? If you are like me, you are probably picturing a Viking-helmeted, rotund woman singing in a foreign language at a pitch that could shatter glass. You may also have imagined an audience full of elitist individuals, decked out in fancy clothes and clutching their opera glasses as they sneer at their social … Continue reading Rossini’s Cinderella: Appearance is everything… Or is it? (Review)

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Why I’m Angry About the Women’s March

by Sanaa Humayun Edmonton’s Women’s march left me with mixed feelings. I’ve tried to write this article a hundred times, I’ve procrastinated and made excuses, I’ve found myself absolutely incapable of coherently explaining this mix of pride and anger I feel in my heart. When I think of what’s happening, my heart pounds faster – my palms become sweaty and I realize, more than anything, … Continue reading Why I’m Angry About the Women’s March

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Political Redux: January 2017

by Chris Berger The New Year is conventionally a time for fresh beginnings, but these have certainly taken an unorthodox, bewildering, and frankly ominous form in 2017.  At three levels of consideration, politics is headed into territory we probably wouldn’t have expected a year or two ago. Alberta Here in Alberta, the “Unite the Right” movement, led on the one side by Progressive Conservative leadership … Continue reading Political Redux: January 2017