Comical Musings of a Chronic Overthinker

by Zosia Czarnecka 5:25 pm. I’m almost there. I can definitely make it in five minutes. But maybe I should go back home quickly. They won’t mind if I’m a little late, right? I’m just so worried that the glass casserole I placed on top of the fridge is going to slide off and break. I mean, the bottom is a little uneven and the … Continue reading Comical Musings of a Chronic Overthinker

From Pop Culture to High Culture

by Chris Berger A cottage industry of sorts has been made out of deploring the effects of large-scale entertainment on the modern psyche and its tastes and judgment, on its alleged tendency to drain artistic and philosophic depth. This has in turn been sparring with a counter-industry that attacks such considerations and objections as reactionary, antiquarian, and nostalgic, not to mention cranky and stuffy. I … Continue reading From Pop Culture to High Culture

Train(ing)

by Nicholas Amadeus Siennicki She looked up from the glare of her phone screen, closing her eyes for a moment as she stretched her back and allowed her head to roll backwards. The monotonous thudding of metal wheels running along tracks pervaded through the barrier of sound that her headphones were creating, just for a moment. She looked down at her phone again, but quickly paused … Continue reading Train(ing)

Rethinking our Perceptions and Embracing Change

by Maja Staka Saturday afternoon, Kathryn Lennon, a planner with the City of Edmonton’s CITYlab team, walked onstage to face a crowd of faces shrouded in darkness. Her smile was warm, and her voice unwavering. Pointing towards the PowerPoint behind her, she seemed eager to continue. “So whenever I visit a new city, I end up in Chinatown because I find that there’s a sense … Continue reading Rethinking our Perceptions and Embracing Change

Proud of Edmonton’s Social Initiatives

by Sareeta Lopez Back in September, the #MakeItAwkward campaign was born. If you don’t know what that is, here’s a description of what happened from the website: Jesse Lipscombe was the victim of a verbal racial attack in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, while he was shooting a PSA for the city downtown. The attack was caught on camera and the video quickly went viral.  Jesse was hurt … Continue reading Proud of Edmonton’s Social Initiatives

Cycle this Halcyon Daze

by Nicholas Siennicki Content Warning: Graphic Depictions of Mental Disorder The boy tapped a forefinger against the side of an empty coffee mug, and each stroke spelled out his countenance more obviously than words ever could. She was acutely aware that they had been sitting in silence for what was now fast becoming an uncomfortably long time. Her brain tried to rifle through a rolodex … Continue reading Cycle this Halcyon Daze

Getting Things Done, Philosopher Style

by Chris Berger Attempting one’s first steps into philosophic thought is a daunting, frankly reckless, and directionless gamble. I say directionless because good guidance is at such a premium and reckless because we seldom have a clear idea of what we want out of it. As for daunting, those who take such a step with confidence know not what they’re getting into. What is the … Continue reading Getting Things Done, Philosopher Style

Funding Basic Science: A Leap of Faith

by Sydney Hampshire “Ipsa scientia potestas est.” Knowledge itself is power. Science loves Latin for naming. Organisms, anatomy, and phenomena across the disciplines use Latin and Latin, it seems, has an innate tendency towards poetry. “Knowledge itself is power” directs us towards the need for basic science – because basic scientific principles inform our understanding of everything else around us. Unfortunately, in recent years, scientific … Continue reading Funding Basic Science: A Leap of Faith