Connecting the Dots – Thoughts on Arthur M. Melzer’s “Philosophy Between the Lines”

by Chris Berger You’re skeptical of mysticism, you say? Good. So am I. This is probably why a lot of people are skeptical of the idea of esotericism, and more specifically of the idea of an “art of esoteric writing.” Talk of such an art immediately calls to mind associations with the occult, kabbalists, Freemasons, and other arcane codes and secret societies. In large measure, … Continue reading Connecting the Dots – Thoughts on Arthur M. Melzer’s “Philosophy Between the Lines”

The Truth Is Over

by Peter Morley This particular article cannot begin with the word Truth, because I must be judicious with capitalisation. In fact, it will be a challenge for me to write this article concisely without beginning a sentence with the word Truth, or with the word truth, because there is an increasingly popularised distinction between the two. An example of truth would be “Donald Trump has … Continue reading The Truth Is Over

Sense and Sensitivity in the Trump Era

by Nikita-Kiran Singh If I could describe the political events that have transpired in the past week in one word, it would be irony.  The irony of Trump being hailed as “someone who tells it like it is” followed by post-election backpedaling suggesting “he never really meant it when he said all those things about Mexicans, Muslims, and women”; the irony of Democrats being asked to extend kindness … Continue reading Sense and Sensitivity in the Trump Era

Politics by Other Means: Re-Learning How to be Liberal

by Chris Berger The specific political distinction to which political actions and motives can be reduced is that between friend and enemy. — Carl Schmitt, The Concept of the Political Crisis of the Liberal Status Quo Western politics is changing. While this is acutely felt in recent weeks, it has been a long time in the making, and to be blunt: we had this coming.  … Continue reading Politics by Other Means: Re-Learning How to be Liberal

An Introduction to Sara Ruddick’s Ethics of Care | By Anya Zoledziowski, Marnya Jain, Ola Osuch, Mia Bottos & Batul Gulamhusein

A few months ago, a few friends of mine and I learned about ethics of care, a kind of political philosophy. Although each of us had been studying politics for a varying number of years, we were all new to this theory. Ethics of care assumes that extending our abilities to care beyond the private sphere can dramatically alter politics, domestically and internationally. For example, in her … Continue reading An Introduction to Sara Ruddick’s Ethics of Care | By Anya Zoledziowski, Marnya Jain, Ola Osuch, Mia Bottos & Batul Gulamhusein

Kevin O’Leary wants to Make Canada Great Again | By Stéphane Lavoie

Donald Trump is nothing if not practiced at placing himself at the epicentre of attention by repeatedly and unapologetically blurting his interpretation of the cold hard truth. Is conservative Canada really going to fall for its own version of Donald Trump? Canadians who’ve been following the U.S. presidential candidacy race, which has so far been defined by embattled business magnate Donald Trump, have in all likelihood dismissed the events as another … Continue reading Kevin O’Leary wants to Make Canada Great Again | By Stéphane Lavoie

Welcome to the Politics Section, 2016 | By Anya Zoledziowski

2016 has rolled in, and post-holiday grogginess has been replaced by business as usual. As you’ve settled into your daily work and school routines, I’ve been settling into my position at The Wanderer.  My name is Anya Zoledziowski, and I am the new editor of the Politics section. Surprise, surprise, I am currently a political science student at the University of Alberta. Although you don’t need to study political science … Continue reading Welcome to the Politics Section, 2016 | By Anya Zoledziowski

2016 Resolutions for the City of Edmonton | The Wanderer Online

It’s the time of year for one of our annual traditions at The Wanderer – resolutions for the City of Edmonton!  A few of our outstanding leaders in Edmonton have kindly shared their hopes, goals, and wishes for our vibrant city in the upcoming year.  Happy New Year, Edmonton – best wishes for a happy, healthy, and memorable 2016. My resolution for the City of … Continue reading 2016 Resolutions for the City of Edmonton | The Wanderer Online

A Tale of Two Cities: 10th Annual Hurtig Lecture | By Keaton Peterson

Mayors Don Iveson and Calgary’s Naheed Nenshi joined forces to educate — and at times entertain — a sold-out audience at the 10th annual Hurtig Lecture held at the University of Alberta last week. Titled “Cities and the Future of Canada,” the mayors stressed the importance of exporting the best Canada — the Canada to which we all aspire — to the rest of the world. Although the mayors frequently supported … Continue reading A Tale of Two Cities: 10th Annual Hurtig Lecture | By Keaton Peterson

Electoral Voices: Ashima Sumaru-Jurf and the Centre for Race and Culture | By Kate McInnes

Electoral Voices is a series that gives people and organizations around Edmonton a chance to voice their views and concerns regarding the candidates, parties, and platforms vying for power in the upcoming federal election. In a country with the highest ethnic diversity rank in the world, inclusion just isn’t enough. It is obvious that issues regarding immigration and the state of multiculturalism in Canada have … Continue reading Electoral Voices: Ashima Sumaru-Jurf and the Centre for Race and Culture | By Kate McInnes