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Funding Basic Science: A Leap of Faith

by Sydney Hampshire “Ipsa scientia potestas est.” Knowledge itself is power. Science loves Latin for naming. Organisms, anatomy, and phenomena across the disciplines use Latin and Latin, it seems, has an innate tendency towards poetry. “Knowledge itself is power” directs us towards the need for basic science – because basic scientific principles inform our understanding of everything else around us. Unfortunately, in recent years, scientific … Continue reading Funding Basic Science: A Leap of Faith

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Teaching with Dinosaurs – An Interview with Scott Persons

by Chris Berger Scott Persons is a man who has devoted his life to discovery, education, and public science outreach.  A researcher and teacher already lauded for his contributions to the field of paleontology, Edmontonians may know him from his appearances at Nerd Nite events around the city; Canadians, from his Summer 2016 series on CBC radio featuring Alberta dinosaurs; and people the world over, … Continue reading Teaching with Dinosaurs – An Interview with Scott Persons

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Where My Ladies At?

by Devyn Rorem Where my ladies at? While being recently sucked into a Youtube Vortex, clicking on one video after another to avoid doing my homework, I stumbled upon a video with the aforementioned title. The video, by Emily Graslie of Brainscoop, questioned why science education media was so male dominated. She offered a few reasons as to what could be causing this: women seem … Continue reading Where My Ladies At?

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The Right To Die | By Sunny Fong

November 2010 Untreatable. Degenerative. After days of diagnostic testing, that is what my neurologist told me. “Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis” he continued. “You probably know it from Stephen Hawking. ALS is a neurodegenerative disease, primarily affecting the motor neurons in the nervous system, as well as the muscles in your body. You will still have all your sensations, but won’t be able to react to them.” … Continue reading The Right To Die | By Sunny Fong

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Discovering Game Development in Alberta | By Hanhmi Huynh

The game development industry remains one of the fastest growing industries, and there is no doubt that there is a surge in game production and studios here in Canada. Globally, the video game industry is estimated to generate over 100 billion dollars in revenue annually. In Canada, a recent report from the Entertainment Software Association of Canada revealed that the video game industry contributed 3 billion dollars to the Canadian … Continue reading Discovering Game Development in Alberta | By Hanhmi Huynh

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Science and the City: January, February, and March | By Hanhmi Huynh

Welcome back Wanderer readers! I hope the past few months have been good to you — your January full of the promise of a new year, your February full of love rather than broken bonds, and your March well-rounded (pun intended). There were many science inspired events that I am ecstatic to share with you, and there are many more coming up that I hope to … Continue reading Science and the City: January, February, and March | By Hanhmi Huynh

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Periodic Chemistry | By Daniel Neuman

My love, we have some special kind of chemistry, just listen, I may be a Bohr, But I kneel softly to your atomic structures. I can be periodically noble, And I don’t know what Lead me to you, But that first kiss, like how they do in Francium with the Toungue-sten, I wasn’t into role-play but I let you play Copper, While we listened to … Continue reading Periodic Chemistry | By Daniel Neuman

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The International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes | By Srosh Hassan

“There is nothing like first-hand evidence.” ~ Sherlock Holmes, A Study in Scarlet You can experience first-hand evidence for yourself at The International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes! In its only stop in Canada, this featured exhibit at the TELUS World of Science Edmonton transports you to 1886 Victorian London to the study of a struggling young doctor, Arthur Conan Doyle. Visitors get a glimpse into his inspiration and experiences leading to the … Continue reading The International Exhibition of Sherlock Holmes | By Srosh Hassan

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Science and the City: November and December | By Hanhmi Huynh

Welcome back to a new semester and another edition of Science and the City! November and December marked the end of the fall semester for thousands of students in the city and the concluding months of 2015 for everyone. In the midst of the staggering pressure to perform well on exams, the anxiety of reviewing a semester’s worth of material for multiple courses (or for … Continue reading Science and the City: November and December | By Hanhmi Huynh

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SurgerWii | By Jenny Yoon

From growing up playing StarCraft to adopting a special interest in surgery, perhaps it was fate that I was able to participate in a study on the applications of video games as a method of improving surgical skills. The study is led by Dr. Simon Byrns, an ambitious senior surgical resident working on his Masters in Experimental Surgery through the Clinical Investigator Program. The aim of the … Continue reading SurgerWii | By Jenny Yoon