Routine: A Short Story

by Chris Linden You’ll go to work at six thirty like you do every morning. You’ll open the doors, turn on the espresso machine, and wait for the crowd to form. It’ll be another normal day in another normal job. You’ll smile at your regular customers and ask them how their weekends were. You might even have their drink ready before they order. George comes … Continue reading Routine: A Short Story

Edmonton’s best hidden dessert spots: Southside Edition

by Maja Staka Are you tired of being bombarded with images of chocolate truffles, peppermint squares and pumpkin spiced everything on social media? Do you go through your day thinking: Office colleagues, I IMPLORE YOU, stop bringing freshly basked croissants and donuts to work. Your weekly sugar tirades are a burden on my life and health and I can’t take a moment more of it! … Continue reading Edmonton’s best hidden dessert spots: Southside Edition

Avila Arepa: Like walking into your mother’s kitchen

by Elisabeth Hill At two pm on a Sunday, Avila Arepa on Whyte Ave remains lively, with several handmade wooden tables populated by customers. Latin pop music and colourful décor paying homage to the owners’ hometown of Caracas, Venezuela add to the energy. Luckily for me, owners Rolando and Samantha are friendly and excited to talk about their restaurant and Venezuelan food and culture – … Continue reading Avila Arepa: Like walking into your mother’s kitchen

The Transformative Power of a Sick Playlist: A Reading of Michelle Winters’ I Am a Truck

by Erica Osko Of the novels on the Giller Prize shortlist, I Am a Truck certainly has the most catching title.  With a bit of research, I learned it’s the debut novel by New Brunswick-based Michelle Winters, who wrote it entirely in the evenings while working a full-time job. Inspired that a first-time novelist using an independent publisher made the prestigious shortlist, I had to … Continue reading The Transformative Power of a Sick Playlist: A Reading of Michelle Winters’ I Am a Truck

A Man, A Plan, A Vacuum Cleaner, Havana: a review of the absurdly wonderful Our Man in Havana

by Monika Viktorova Looking to escape the drab, grey cold outside? Step into the colourful and absurd world of Our Man in Havana, the Varscona Theater Ensemble and Bright Young Things’ production of the novel by Graham Greene, adapted by Clive Francis. Peppered with bawdy humor and more winks to the audience than I can count, the story follows bumbling, ineffective Wormold, a vacuum salesman … Continue reading A Man, A Plan, A Vacuum Cleaner, Havana: a review of the absurdly wonderful Our Man in Havana

The Power of Cute

by Rita Maria Neyer Here is a thought that many of you can probably relate to in one way or another (for women of colour, LBGTQ+, and non-binary people, the story would be even more complex, but I am bound to speak from my own experience as a cis-gender ‘white’ woman). Maybe a friend told you about a similar situation, or maybe you’ve been there … Continue reading The Power of Cute

Before It Was A Needle

by Katherine Abbass Once Molly had explained to me her ancestry, things started making more sense. I knew there were freshwater leeches and saltwater leeches and that they, unlike snakes, really were slimy to the touch. Her parents wanted her to be a doctor, of course; medical history tells us that leeches were used to extract blood from patients. The sensation isn’t even too bad. … Continue reading Before It Was A Needle

What’s in the News?

by Christopher Berger Like it or not, we’re faced with the need to curate our sources of information. In one sense, we are blessed with innumerable, easily accessed media for news. But as anyone who has spent any time online will know, an overwhelming majority of it is, frankly, garbage. We are therefore compelled to be selective. Twitter and Facebook are good cases in point … Continue reading What’s in the News?

(Not) Unpacking My Library

by Kevin Holowack In the past couple years, I’ve packed and unpacked all my belongings four times. It’s not an egregious amount of moving, true, but it’s enough to make you reconsider what inanimate things you’ve chosen to share in your private life and how they affect you. As an urban-dweller, I’m part of a large category of people who idealize a simple existence, a … Continue reading (Not) Unpacking My Library